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Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

 

(COMPARE KCNH TO OTHER SCHOOLS — YOU NEED ANSWERS BEFORE YOU ENROLL)

Be informed—what you don’t know can hurt you!

*Kingdom College of Natural Health is referred to hereinafter as KCNH for the reason of brevity and clarity.

 

  1. How long will it take for me to complete a degree program?
  2. How does KCNH evaluate students and place them in the right programs?
  3. How long will it take for me to complete a certificate or Diploma Program
  4. What kind of coursework method (or design) does KCNH use?
  5. Who grades my coursework?
  6. How do most natural health colleges operate (what’s behind the scene)?
  7. Who grades a student’s course-work at most Distance Learning colleges or universities?
  8. Do I need a degree to enroll at Kingdom College of Natural Health (KCNH)?
  9. Can an average person like ME complete the required coursework to earn a degree?
  10. Do you have on-site classes?
  11. Are there “real” people working at KCNH, or will I always talk to voicemail?
  12. What payment options are offered for my KCNH degree program?
  13. Will I have to pay for my textbooks?
  14. Are the courses self-paced and completed at my leisure?
  15. Do the words “certified” and “certificate” have different meanings?
  16. Is KCNH accredited?
  17. What have privately-owned Accrediting Commissions done to protect those whom they have certified?
  18. Is there a cost for an evaluation of my academic experiences?
  19. How may I enroll in a certificate, diploma or degree program?
  20. Will my coursework be returned to me after it’s graded?
  21. What is the minimum age for enrollment?
  22. Where may I practice naturopathy with the KCNH degree?
  23. What kind of designations may be used for a person who is in a private practice?
  24. May I [legally] use the ND or NMD designation (degree) in the US states and its territories where Licensed Naturopathic Physicians are approved for Licensure?
  25. What states and territories license Naturopathic Physicians?
  26. May I practice all forms of natural health in all 50 states and its territories? If so, how do I do it?
  27. Is the Learning Methodology at KCNH different than other Distance Learning Colleges?
  28. How may I enroll at Kingdom College of Natural Health?
  29. Should I use the title “Counselor” or “Consultant?”
  30. What kind of organization grants the title of “Diplomate?”
  31. When was Kingdom College of Natural Health established?
  32. How does KCNH process and grade a student’s coursework?
  33. How can I motivate myself since distance education requires personal motivation?
  34. Am I permitted to use the word “nutritionist” in all 50 US states?
  35. What happens if I receive the grade of D?
  36. What is the average age of students that enroll at KCNH?
  37. When I graduate, will KCNH assist me in qualifying to purchase quality (professional, third-party tested) supplements for my clients?
  38. What is the average educational level of those who enroll at KCNH? 
  39. Does KCNH have a bookstore for its students?
  40. How many professors does KCNH currently have?
  41. If I earn a doctorate degree from KCNH, should I post my accredited MD degree on my wall alongside my KCNH doctorate, if I don’t have a State Medical Board license to practice as an MD?
  42. Am I permitted to enroll in a dual master/doctorate degree program?
  43. What designations offered by KCNH may I use to practice my healing arts in the USA and other countries?
  44. When I apply for Admission, how long will it be before I know whether I’ve been accepted?
  45. Do you have area chapters of KCNH in some cities?
  46. Does KCNH offer clinical training?
  47. Does KCNH have a graduation ceremony?
  48. Do we permit someone to enroll in a single course?
  49. Does KCNH help a graduate get approval for laboratory testing and devices?
  50. Is KCNH approved for Financial Aid?
  51. Since KCNH is a US-based 501-3 c “not for profit” corporation, may I write off my tuition?
  52. Will I able to use e-books to complete my studies?
  53. If I live outside the USA, how do I make my payments for my studies?
  54. If I live outside the USA, will I have to pay extra to have my certificate, diploma, or degree sent to me?
  55. What is the refund policy of KCNH?
  56. What are the academic standards of KCNH?
  57. Why doesn’t KCNH use the “Go-At-Your-Own-Pace” learning principle?
  58. Does KCNH offer a diploma or degree in Spanish?
  59. Does KCNH have a diploma or degree in Integrative Medicine?
  60. Could I learn something about the history of natural healing (or naturopathy) in the USA?
  61. Does KCNH offer any accelerated degree programs?
  62. What type of support does KCNH offer once a student enrolls?
  63. Does a degree earned at KCNH have any value?

 


 

1.  How long will it take for me to complete a degree program?

This depends on the degree program chosen and how much credit you receive for life experience and former academic studies. When someone enrolls in a doctorate degree, KCNH typically gives little to no credit unless someone wishes to transfer credits at a doctorate level. Many who contact KCNH about its programs are not aware of these academic matters, but since KCNH attracts individuals who already hold masters or doctorate degrees, they are better informed. However, from time-to-time some individuals wrongly believe that credits earned in a Certificate of Completion may be transferred into a doctorate program. This is unacceptable in accordance with the standards set forth by academic educational institutions throughout the world. Completed credits at a doctorate level should be accepted by most institutions and transferred into a doctorate program; this usually applies to all degrees.

Under normal conditions, our degrees require the same length of time to earn as those granted by major universities. Sadly, many Distance Learning natural health colleges fall short of this standard. The bachelor’s degree takes between 3 ½ to 4 years to complete. The master's degree takes approximately 2 years; the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) takes approximately 3 ½ to 4 years to complete, though an adept student may complete it in less time.

NOTES ON THE Ph.D.: The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree was developed in Europe about 350 years ago. Even today, it still remains the world’s most prestigious degree. In most universities, the Ph.D. will take 4 to 5 years (or longer) to earn, and should never require less than 80 to 100 academic credit hours. In Europe, a student will invest approximately 12 years of study to complete a Ph.D., while an M.D. degree requires approximately 8 years. In Europe, the Ph.D. is more respected in most circles than the M.D.

NOTES ON THE N.D: The Doctor of Naturopathy degree (N.D.) requires approximately 2 ½ to 3 years to earn. NOTE: Time limits that are less than the above mentioned are not acceptable, based on the standards of long-time academic criteria.

A RHETORICAL QUESTION: Would you feel comfortable having a Medical Doctor to treat you, if you discovered that he/she had completed only 2 years of medical school studies and not the required [standard] 4 years, and had completed only a one-year residency?   

2. How does KCNH evaluate students and place them in the right programs?

KCNH will give some limited credit to applicants but is careful not to give too much credit for life experiences, since this is a trap used by diploma mills to snare an innocent seeker into “buying a degree” without taking the required number of studies to earn it. Some schools (to appear legitimate) even charge students for life experience credit given them—essentially this is selling a degree. We feel if you are promised credit for former academic studies and/or life experiences, this should be free. The application of each student is carefully evaluated by a supervisor, and then the supervisor informs the potential student as to the program that is best for him/her based upon his/her needs and qualifications.

NOTE CONCERNING ACCREDITATION: Accreditation may be challenged as not being essential to excellence in learning.  And in most instances, private educational institutions and those that hold a 501 c-3 status are exempted from holding accreditation. There are numerous privately owned Accrediting Associations, and all of them are essentially the same, but have different standards and charge different fees for accreditation. As a general rule such Associations, Societies, Councils, or Alliances sometimes certify graduates of the schools they accredit.    

3. How long would it take me to complete a certificate or diploma Program?

Our certificate program will take a student about 3 to 4 months (12 academic credit hours) to complete and a diploma may be completed in approximately 12 months (30 academic credit hours). This is in keeping with the acceptance criteria that have been established by educational institutions in the United States and in foreign countries. FOR EXAMPLE, A Bachelor’s degree (U.S. standard) usually requires about 120 academic credit hours to complete which means that a student will complete approximately 30 academic credit hours per year and earn his/her degree in 4 years.  

4.  What kind of coursework method (or design) does KCNH use?

The KCNH methodology is unique and designed to assist a student in learning and also remembering what he/she has studied. Most of our assignments incorporate true & false statements, multiple-choice questions, and statements,  fill-in-the-blanks, essays/summaries, review of the author(s), special lectures by video, DVD, CD, projects, theses, outlines, Online Campus discussions, and learning through Skype call, Google Hangouts or Conference Calls. Each course assignment will be emailed to you. A student will receive a list of textbooks required for each class when he/she enrolls.

NOTES ON DESIGNING YOUR OWN COURSES: Today many major universities in the United States are using the same method KCNH pioneered many years ago. When we learn that a growing number of other universities are now advertising that one may help design his/her own master’s degree, this is what is meant. The old system of learning, which has been used for over 60 years in the United States, is to be blamed for lowering the level of education of our country to ranking number 17 in the world in reading, 25 in Math and 27 in Science.

EXAMPLE: Many standard learning programs state for a student: “You must read and study the textbook and answer 500 questions designed by a professor.” Perhaps even an essay may be required as well. Best of all KCNH does not use this out-of-date learning system, nor do we require final tests for students. Educational psychologists even question the benefits of giving a final test to students. However, you may be required to answer some short questions at the end of some chapters in your textbooks, but under no conditions will KCNH ever use final tests, which serve only to frighten students. Our coursework assignments are designed in such a way that the professor (course-grader) already knows how much you know without giving you a final test.  Therefore, a final test is redundant and not required.

THE QUESTION IS: When you complete a course using the traditional university method, how much do you remember of the completed course?  The answer is, “You learned, but remember very little.”

5.  Who grades my coursework?

Only expert professors who hold earned doctorate degrees in the healing arts field will grade your coursework. This method guarantees you the best education possible. After your coursework is graded, you will receive a grade sheet with the name and notes from the grading professor. Most KCNH professors (or mentors) have over 20 years’ experience in the health field and some have over thirty or forty years. If you are making plans to practice some form of the healing arts, you cannot learn much from professors who know nothing about practicing natural healing. For this reason, we are very proud to announce that, at the present time, 98 percent of all KCNH course-graders are in a professional practice of alternative medicine or natural health. 

6. How do most natural health colleges operate (what’s behind the scene)?

Some natural health schools have a “Mom and Pop” program. They don’t have any professors. If they do have professors, it may be two or three at the most. If they had professors, their photos would be posted on the school’s website, along with the background and educational credentials of the professors (course-graders; lecturers). Some (not all) don’t have photos of the President, Vice President, or other officials on their Website. Why? It’s likely a one person or “Mom and Pop” operation. 

SOMETHING TO CONSIDER: Many natural health schools don’t have a photo or list the educational background of professors, because of the concern that a potential student may wish to check the credentials of the officials and professors. Some unprofessional schools grant degrees to friends so as to make them professors, without requiring any studies. Though many websites make bold claims, in some instances the money is going into the pockets of one or two individuals, who are supposedly so smart and educated that they can grade all kinds of difficult courses such as Pathology, Anatomy & Physiology, Biology, Immunology, Microbiology, Chemistry, etc. Are we expected to believe that one or two individuals on the planet possess this kind of knowledge? This is why all students from these types of aforementioned schools receive the grade of A but receives little [genuine or true] education. When a student doesn’t receive any comments from a professor and is given an A, there will be nothing to contest. But at KCNH, when a student receives a lower grade than they feel that they deserve, from our course-grading expert professors, the student will sometimes challenge his/her grade. This challenge is submitted to the Dean and a Committee that will consider the circumstances of why the grade was given. Sometimes a student’s grade may be changed, or on the other hand, it may remain as is. But if a student really should receive the lower grade, why then, does he/she receive an A from some other colleges? If KCNH gave every student an A, would not this be an injustice to the student who really worked hard to earn an A? Would it not also be an injustice to those in the public who seek to heal, because the so-called “expert” who purports to help clients is not what he/she is supposed to be?

7. Who grades a student’s course-work at most Distance Learning colleges or universities?

Though it may appear presumptuous, it appears that in most cases no one grades the assignments of students. In fact, a student’s course-work may often be thrown into a trash can and the grade of A is given. If every student receives an A, why should any coursework ever be graded? Many schools do not list the name of the professor who graded a student’s coursework. Again, this leads any logical thinker to assume that no one graded the coursework.

NOTE: KCNH requires that all grading professors print and sign their names at the bottom of the grade sheet of each student. We believe that supportive and constructive grading comments are an important part of the learning experience for every student. 

SOMETHING YOU SHOULD KNOW: When KCNH receives transcripts from other natural health colleges, our office staff is often appalled. KCNH was established in 1993 and for these 20 plus years, we have never seen any grades other than A’s on the transcripts of applicants that graduated from natural health distance learning colleges. How can this be? If this is quality education (as some of the schools claim to offer), who wants it? Should we be naïve enough to believe that every student in the world can make an A?

8.  Do I need a degree to enroll at Kingdom College of Natural Health (KCNH)?

No. However, most applicants who wish to enroll at KCNH already have one or two earned degrees. In fact, KCNH tends to attract those who are in professional fields (especially the medical field), but individuals with little education who wish to earn a certificate, diploma or bachelors degree are permitted to enroll also.

WHAT THE PUBLIC DOESN’T KNOW: Unknown to the public is that medical school applicants in the U.S. are not required to hold a master’s degree to enroll in an M.D. program. The same is applicable for Chiropractic and Veterinary medical schools. On the other hand, university professors are required to hold a bachelor, master, and doctorate degree, because these institutions are considered “academic institutions” and these standards have been put into place by the US government.  But those who practice a form of the healing arts in the public domain hold degrees that are considered “Professional Degrees.” Because of this, KCNH will sometimes permit a graduate of our bachelor’s program to enroll directly into a doctorate program (that is if he/she has a GPA of 3.5). This is in keeping with the same criteria held by professional medical schools in the U.S. Many distance learning colleges are springing up every day, but most of them will require that a student earn a bachelors and masters degree before enrolling in a doctorate degree. The reason is open for speculation and the question may be raised as to why this is the rule of these start-up schools? REMEMBER THIS: When you earn your degree, your goal at KCNH is not to become a teacher at a university but rather to open some kind of practice in the healing arts.

9.  Can an average person like ME complete the required coursework to earn a degree?

Absolutely! KCNH has a growing number of non-professionals. We endeavor to make KCNH a comfortable environment with a comprehensive Non-Discrimination Policy. It is the policy of KCNH to provide equal educational and employment opportunities and not to illegally discriminate on the basis of gender, race, national origin, religion, age, marital status, or disability in its educational programs, activities, or its employment and personnel policies. 

10.  Do you have on-site classes?

KCNH does not have an on-going curriculum that requires classroom studies. Some seminars and preclinical training sessions are conducted in hotels in major cities throughout the USA. Also, some courses may be completed by distance educational systems using Skype and Webinars. 

11.   Are there “real” people working at KCNH, or will I always talk to voicemail?

An “Answering Service” is never used during office hours. Presently the office staff (not faculty) consists of fifteen plus individuals who are highly skilled. The staff members are located in various states and perform different functions. Because these individuals are experts in various needs of our students, KCNH is able to be actively involved in connecting with students quickly when they need assistance.  These individuals who are employed by KCNH are computer and phone operators, course material packers/shippers, newsletter writers/editors, and course-designers that perform numerous duties not mentioned herein.

12.   What payment options are offered for my KCNH degree program?

KCNH offers the following payment options:

Monthly payment plans as low as $115.00 per month without interest. NOTE: The accelerated degree by AHPLEX has monthly payments that are slightly higher.

1) One Cash payment upfront. A 10% discount is given.

2) Three (3) payments within 90 days, which is the same as cash. The same discount applies that is permitted in #2 of the aforementioned.

3) Fifteen (15) payments of $115.00 a month. The first payment is submitted with the signed agreement.

4) Twenty-five (25) payments of $115.00 a month until paid in full.

NOTE

MOST DOCTORATE DEGREES offer a payment plan of Fifty-three (53) payments of $115.00 per month. The first payment is $140.00 and must be submitted with the signed agreement. This payment plan is not applicable to the NMD and HMD programs.  

The accelerated degree by AHPLEX offers monthly payments that are slightly higher. 

The aforementioned monthly installment plans do not extend beyond the number of years of your degree program. You will be mailed a statement each month, and your payment is not considered late unless you are 15 days late making your payment.  

KCNH finances all programs at affordable tuition rates for students, interest-free.  This is of great benefit. Please speak to your advisor for full details.

13.  Will I have to pay for my textbooks?

Yes. We will provide you the information needed to order your books at very low rates. You may purchase new or used books—it’s your choice. Some used books sell for as little as $1.00 or less. 

14.  Are the courses self-paced and completed at my leisure?

No. Some colleges have encouraged many students to enroll by using the phrase “You may study at your own pace.” But everyone has a different understanding of what “Study At your Own Pace” really means. The ‘self-paced” method leads to a very high drop-out rate. KCNH has an excellent record of student satisfaction because students are sent one course at a time with each three or four credit hour course taking approximately eight weeks to complete. KCNH requires most courses be completed within eight weeks. Though many colleges use the words “self-paced” to attract students, we've learned if there is no “turn-in” date posted on the assignment page, coursework is never finished on time. Our method is called “Independent-Guided Studies” and not “Self-Paced Studies.” Although there is structure, there is flexibility. If a student struggles to meet his/her “turn-in” date due to illness, vacation time, loss of job, divorce, etc., our faculty is most understanding and gives extensions and gives him/her a new turn-in date. This method also keeps us in contact with what’s happening in the lives of our students. In an effort to encourage a student who is grieving or worried about certain matters, KCNH will send inspirational cards and sometimes telephone him/her to encourage him/her.

15. Do the words “certified” and “certificate” have different meanings?

Yes, they have different meanings.

CERTIFIED: Those who understand the principles of academia know the difference in the meanings of the two words, but the public doesn’t. EXAMPLE: If a professional knows the in’s and out’s (principles) of academia, and observes that a natural health consultant has posted on his/her office wall the designation of “Certified Nutritionist” or sees the word “certified” on any document, granted by a college (or university), this academic would doubt the consultant’s abilities, education and credibility. Though some colleges, or universities, claim that a graduate may receive a “Certified Diploma” in some discipline relevant to natural health, remember that “certification” should never be granted from a college or university, but from an Association, Society, Council, or Alliance. This has always been the accepted criterion in the US and other countries. Some Associations (or any of the aforementioned groups) often inscribe on its wall documents phrases such as: “John (or Mary) Smith is Board Certified in…” Now the aforementioned wording is considered acceptable in academic circles.

AN IMPORTANT QUESTION: If a natural health college is accredited by several Certifying Associations, why then is the degree-granting college (or university) using the word “certified” on its own certificates, diplomas, or degrees given to graduates, when this kind of certification should always be granted by an outside Agency, Group or Commission?

Certificate: This designation usually alludes to a course and/or courses that a student has completed. A “certificate” is not considered an academic instrument and is not a degree. And for that matter nor is a “diploma,” though a diploma has more value and merit than a certificate.

16.  Is KCNH accredited?

Yes, but not nationally or regionally accredited, which means that KCNH is not listed with the US Department of Education, nor does it wish to be. The amount of money required in the pursuit of attaining governmental accreditation and the bureaucratic red tape involved is too much to bear for most schools. In fact, some in the public falsely believe that if a school is recognized by the US Dept. of Education everything must be honest. This is just another fallacy. The bottom line is: If you are interested in enrolling in a college you should check its history, date established, and the testimonials of students. Even if KCNH were recognized by the US Department of Education, this would not permit a graduate to acquire a license in “naturopathy” or any kind of natural health field in any state.  Only a “Licensed Naturopathic Physician may acquire a license in 18 states.

BE INFORMED: All 50 US states and territories will permit one to practice natural (or holistic) health with a degree that is not national or regionally accredited, though the ND is restricted in some US states and some Canadian provinces.  However, students get confused about accreditation and some colleges [even] mislead students who inquire about accreditation. When a student asks the question, “Are you accredited?” It is assumed that he/she is asking “Are you nationally or regionally accredited?” To our knowledge, there are not any regionally accredited [Distance Educational] schools, colleges, or universities of natural health in America at this point in time. Therefore, it is doubtful that KCNH credits will transfer to other colleges or universities that are regionally accredited, but will transfer to nearly all the privately accredited schools. In the near future, some colleges will probably attain regionally accreditation. But at the present, this is not a significant factor. Some important questions for you to consider are, “Does the college of your choice offer a quality education. Does it employ qualified professors who will grade your coursework?” And if it does, “How will you determine that?”

17. What have privately-owned Accrediting Commissions done to protect those whom they have certified?

Most Accrediting Commissions have done little or nothing when an accredited member was taken to court. Many Associations, Alliances, Societies and Councils claim they have the right & authority to accredit (sometimes license or certify) individuals to practice all forms of naturopathy, acupuncture, herbology, iridology, homeopathy, & other forms of healing. Some exceptions to the aforementioned may be Ecclesiastical Orders, Religious Sects, Religious Societies or Associations that offer a license. But again, remember that their license is not a state license. If an Association grants an Ecclesiastical license to someone and he/she decides to post the license on the wall of his/her office wall, this may bring about a false sense of security. This kind of Ecclesiastical license does not supersede state law, and furthermore may likely be challenged in the courts. The long-time acceptable rule has been: “No license granted by any Association nullifies State laws.” Cases are being fought in court every day and to our knowledge not one of the so-called “accrediting” or “certifying” groups have defended a practitioner that it has certified. Joining such groups gives a practitioner a false sense of well-being and safety because these [certifying] groups have failed to protect anyone from legal entanglements. Their promises to “fight for” the rights of practitioners have been forgotten. Practitioners are left to fend for themselves, fight their own battles and pay their own court fees. To our knowledge, not a single court case has been won by a practitioner who wasn't licensed by the state, although one Ecclesiastical Group claims that it has won some cases, though this claim had not been validated when the Ecclesiastical Groups were questioned about the details. Certification and/or licensure granted by any privately owned association, society, council, or alliance when not approved or accredited by a state where a practitioner practices, may not benefit a “practitioner” unless the entity that granted the document is willing to fight for the practitioner in the courts.  

18.  Is there a cost for an evaluation of my academic experiences?

No. Most colleges charge a non-refundable fee of $50-75.00. KCNH does not charge a person to evaluate him/her for enrollment. Why? If a student applies to several colleges, these fees will become a financial burden and may cost a potential student upwards of $300.00. Your first payment is not due until you accept, sign and return your contract agreement to KCNH. Your first payment is to be sent along with your signed agreement. And to make it easy for you, paying by check, money order or PayPal is permitted.

19. How may I enroll in a certificate, diploma or degree program?

Complete the proper application online, or in the KCNH catalog. IMPORTANT:  Select the degree of your choice and tell us everything about yourself—the more the better. Send it to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. If approved, you will be contacted by e-mail within 24 to 48 hours (guaranteed) after we receive your application. The evaluator will be happy to answer any questions via telephone when you talk to him/her. However, you will not be officially enrolled until you sign the enrollment agreement and return it to KCNH along with your first payment. Once your signed agreement is received, you will be considered officially enrolled and your first assignment will be sent to you.

WHEN DO I SEND MY TRANSCRIPTS? 

You will be given ninety (90) days after your enrollment date to send KCNH your transcripts (copies are acceptable). This method has worked well for the student and KCNH. It gives a student an opportunity to email quickly without delay. In the event that we (KCNH) do not receive the transcripts as promised, a student is expelled from the program. To this date, such a drastic measure on our part has not been necessary.

20.  Will my coursework be returned to me after it’s graded?

No. You should keep a record of your completed coursework when you send it to KCNH. After your coursework has been graded, a grade sheet will be sent to you with the grading professor’s name, your grade, along with comments from your professor. The exception is workbooks which will be returned to you, so that you may keep them in your personal library for future research and references. All other student coursework will be destroyed within six (6) months by our professors. Students must make copies of their coursework before sending to KCNH. If your completed coursework, by chance, is lost by the US Postal Service, UPS, e-mail errors, FedEx, or lost for other reasons not mentioned herein, and you don’t have a copy of your coursework, you will be required to complete the course again.

21.  What is the minimum age for enrollment?

You must be at least eighteen (18) years of age. In addition, you must have an earned high school diploma, GED, or its equivalent.

22. Where may I practice naturopathy with the KCNH degree?

At the time of this report, 18 states license “Naturopathic Physicians.” It is not advisable for a KCNH practitioner who resides in any of the 18 states listed in point #25, the territories of Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands to state in an advertisement, on a business card, signboard or verbally that he/she is a practitioner of “naturopathy,” or is an “ND” or “NMD.” Be aware that breaking this rule may cost a practitioner dearly in fines or prison time.

NOTES ON CERTIFICATION: We recommend that you attain certification through one or both of the following Commissions: The American Council of Holistic Medicine (ACHM-Florida) or the American Association of Drugless Practitioners (AADP-Texas). Having Board Certification from the aforementioned certifying commissions does not nullify state laws that may pertain to the practice of naturopathy, but certification does help to establish credibility. There are certain countries that may restrict you from practicing naturopathy (and homeopathy). These countries are Canada, Switzerland, Great Britain (and possibly other UK countries), France, Germany—and other countries in Europe may have restrictions against practicing naturopath.  If you reside outside the United States, you should investigate the laws of your country concerning the practice of naturopathy, natural health, homeopathy, or natural medicine. NOTE: It is not difficult to practice in Mexico, South and Central America, and Brazil. However, Brazil may have more restraints against unlicensed practitioners than other countries in South America.

There are other designations that a graduate may use rather than the ND or NMD. These are listed in point #23.

23. What kind of designations may be used for a person who is in a private practice?

While some states may not permit one to use designations or advertisement that read, naturopathic, naturopathy, homeopathy, and nutrition, any of the following certificates, diplomas, or degrees offered by KCNH may be used in all 50 states and its territories. 

• Natural Health Specialist

• Natural Health Practitioner

• Natural Health Consultant (Do not use “counselor”—some states restrict the word)

• Holistic Health Practitioner

• Herbal Consultant

• Natural Wellness Consultant

• Homeopathic Consultant (Some restrictions may apply in Nevada and Arizona)

• Nutritional Consultant (Some states restrict the use of the word ‘nutritional” or “nutrition”). Inquire about State Laws before using the above-mentioned words.

NOTE: All certificates, diplomas, bachelors, masters degrees, and doctorate degrees offered by KCNH may be used in all 50 states and U.S. territories with the exception of the ND and NMD. Again, the word “nutritional” or “nutrition” may bring liabilities to some practitioners in some states, regardless of whether it’s a “certificate, diploma or degree.” 

24. May I [legally] use the ND or NMD designation (degree) in the US states and its territories where Licensed Naturopathic Physicians are approved for Licensure?

No. Something you should know is that each of the 18 states (see point #25) that have granted licensure to “Licensed Naturopathic Physicians” have different regulations. FOR EXAMPLE: In the eighteen states that have “Licensed Naturopathic Physicians,” permission has been granted for drawing blood, giving injections, and performing minor surgery. In other words, they perform some of the functions that are identical to licensed medical doctors. In California, the scope of the NMD practice may include prescribing some medications and antibiotics. In Arizona, “Licensed Naturopathic Physicians” have permission to go beyond the other 18 states and are even permitted to deliver babies, practice psychiatry, and practice acupuncture. Colorado has refused to permit Licensed Naturopathic Physicians to be called “physicians,” but are referred to as “Licensed Naturopaths.” Colorado also has placed further restrictions on “Licensed Naturopaths.” They cannot provide any care for children under the age of two and strict limitations also apply for the treatment of children who are between the ages of 2 and 8. NOTE: KCNH has the greatest number of quality doctoral degrees offered in the U.S. by any distance education institution. There are many other titles that a graduate may use in his/her practice, but again it would be risky for a practitioner to use the ND or NMD designation in states that have established a Board for "Licensed Naturopathic Physicians.”   

25. What states and territories license Naturopathic Physicians?

What is a Licensed Naturopathic Physician? In the following states they are [natural health] doctors who are required to be graduates of a regionally accredited four-year residential naturopathic medical school and pass a rigorous board examination called the NPLEX before they are granted a license. These doctors (“Licensed Naturopathic Physicians”) must complete mandates as set forth by the state within their practice by completing Continuing Educational Units (or studies) on a yearly basis. Nearly all of the following 18 states have different guidelines, restrictions, etc. for “Licensed Naturopathic Physicians”.  

• Alaska

• Arizona

• California

• Colorado

• Connecticut

• District of Columbia

• Hawaii

• Kansas

• Maine

• Maryland

• Minnesota

• Montana

• New Hampshire

• North Dakota

• Oregon

• Utah

• Vermont

• Washington

• United States Territories are: Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands

*Licensed Naturopathic Physicians have licensure in 18 states and 2 US territories

Important points about practicing Naturopathy in three additional states not alluded to herein:

MAY SOMEONE PRACTICE WITH AN ND OR NMD DEGREE IN FLORIDA? Yes, some people wrongly assume that Florida has restrictions on the designations of ND or NMD, but this is not true. KCNH has a large number of practitioners in the state of Florida who have earned the ND and NMD degrees, and to this date, none of them have been restricted by the state. Nonetheless, because “Licensed Naturopathic Physicians” have a growing number of political friends on their side in Florida (even in the Florida State Legislature), state officials sometimes warn an inquirer on the telephone about using the N.D. or N.MD. in Florida, but this means little. Someone you may speak with may say, “We prefer that individuals not use the N.D. or N.MD.” But if you’ll ask, “Are there state restrictions?” The answer will always be “no”.

A TRUE STORY: On a certain occasion about six years ago, a representative of KCNH was contacted by a female Attorney who was practicing law in Florida. She said, “When I called the state officials in Florida someone tried to discourage me from acquiring and practicing with an N.D. degree. But when the Attorney asked about the laws that restrict the use of the N.D. degree, she was told, ‘We have no law that restricts the use of the N.D. degree.’ ” Then the Attorney said to the KCNH representative, “This is why I am contacting KCNH—I wish to get enrolled right away!”

TWO STATES THAT HAVE LAWS THAT RESTRICT THE PRACTICE OF NATUROPATHY: The states of Tennessee and South Carolina have old laws on their books dating back to the 1930’s that make Naturopathy illegal. When a potential student resides in one of these states and researches on the internet and learns this, he/she becomes frightened. But since KCNH has many practitioners in these two states, we have learned that these laws are never enforced unless you are a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathy (D0). Some KCNH officials have personally spoken with two D.O.’s and one M.D. from the state of Tennessee that had their licenses revoked because of using homeopathy and naturopathy with their patients. But to our knowledge there has never been anyone fined or imprisoned for practicing naturopathy (or any form of natural health, wellness, medicine)) in the states of Tennessee and South Carolina.  

THE HISTORY OF NATUROPATHY: Some of these laws in Tennessee and South Carolina were implemented in the early 1900’s and others in the 1930’s. Naturopathy took root in New York when the founder, Benedict Lust, a Christian monk (monastic) from Europe arrived there. He used hydrotherapy, herbs, and other healing techniques to heal illnesses. Over time as Naturopathy gained popularity, it spread to Florida, where retired New Yorker’s retired. Then it spread to South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and other states. The rapid growth of Naturopathy aroused the MDs who were allopathic practitioners. So the MD's set out to stop the spread of Naturopathy in the courts and were successful in getting nearly all the states that had granted a license to naturopaths to revoke them. Since naturopaths had been given the right to hold a license in several states to deliver babies, perform surgery, and perform many procedures that Medical Doctors performed, this was certainly a threat to the MDs.

BE AWARE OF THIS: Relevant to the practice of Naturopathy today in Tennessee and South Carolina, there is little to be concerned about. If these states arrested even one person for practicing Naturopathy or for using the designations of ND or NMD, then everyone using the naturopathic designations in these states would [out of necessity] be arrested also. This would be such a scandal it would be on the national news overnight. This will never happen, just as it will never happen in Texas inasmuch as Texas continually warns unaccredited schools by mail that they are offering “illegal degrees” to natural health practices in Texas as determined by the Texas Department of Education. But there has never been any practitioners arrested, and furthermore, it is questionable if any state can legally state, “Someone cannot earn a degree from an unaccredited college while living in this state.” Why are unlicensed naturopaths in Texas never arrested, though they earned their degrees from unaccredited schools? The answer is simple. Some of the hundreds of naturopathic practitioners in Tennessee, South Carolina, and more than 10,000 in Texas are politically connected to friends and relatives that reside in the state legislative branches. If even one is arrested or fined this would create a national firestorm. Nonetheless, the scare tactics remain in place in Florida, South Caroline, and Texas to deter someone from practicing natural health of any kind, especially naturopathy.

 A FINAL POINT TO CONSIDER: Regardless of where you practice your healing arts, there are certain words and actions that are prohibited by laws in all 50 states and US territories. If you were to break these laws, you will likely be prosecuted or fined by state officials. It is always best to have your clients to sign a contract that clearly states you’re not a Doctor of Medicine (MD), and that you don’t diagnose or treat disease, but rather, a natural health Consultant, Educator, or Specialist. This contract is essential for a practitioner and should be dated and signed by each of your clients and by you, the Natural Health Consultant.

SOMETHING OF INTEREST: We are proud to report that since our inception in 1993, KCNH has never had even one [practicing] consultant be fined or imprisoned for breaking state laws. However, we do know of some practitioners who have graduated from other schools that were fined and given prison time up 10 to 15 years. These terrible things happen because of someone being misguided or uninformed about what is legal and permissible. In fact, it is purported that more than 500,000 [unlicensed] natural health practitioners are now practicing in all 50 states and U.S. territories. So it appears that not having a license is not a big problem and it should not be of concern at the present time.  

DO YOU HAVE FURTHER QUESTIONS ABOUT ANYTHING LISTED IN POINT 25, OR ANYTHING THUS FAR? If you live in the US mainland and have further questions about any of the aforementioned, you may call our Student Information Division Toll Free at 1-888-223-8056. Representatives are available from 9 am to 5 pm, Mon-Fri, Central Standard Time zone. Representatives are not available on weekends or major holidays. All other inquiries can be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

26. May I practice all forms of natural health in all 50 states and its territories? If so, how do I do it?

Yes, you may practice all forms of natural health, but you must use a designation that is permitted by the state and you must conduct your business (or private practice) as a Consultant, Educator, or Specialist. One of the most crucial points to remember is: “You should always use a written contract before beginning any kind of consultation with a client.” We have copies of several contracts (or agreements) you may freely use with your clients. Moreover, you should always carry liability insurance, and reinforce what you clearly will and will not do via a written contract.

NOTES ON “COMMON SENSE” PRACTICING: Having a client sign a contract that explains what you are and what you will do is not relevant to the first visit. On the first visit, you should try to limit to 10 to 20 minutes based on your schedule, and inform your potential client as to what you will do and not do. Also, you should only discuss the reason he/she has contacted you, your fees, and how often he/she should expect to schedule appointments. Under no conditions should you give any advice or consult with them about their physical maladies until a contract is signed. Either let the first visit be free or charge a minimal fee of, perhaps, $30.00. If they decide to use your service, be sure to schedule the next appointment within 24 to 48 hours. Have the client come an hour early so that he/she may complete a lengthy form that asks many questions about their age, health, medications, surgeries, kind of job held, etc.

EXAMPLE: There are some Americans that spend much of their time involving themselves in lawsuits on purpose so they can make money on doctors who render treatment and advice. But if everything is clearly spelled out in a written document, and it is signed and dated by a client, it is unlikely that any lawyer would take a case based upon what a client claimed you were, what you said, or what you did.

THE FOLLOWING EXPLAINS WHY SOME PRACTITIONERS DO NOT SUCCEED: They charge a big fee for the short first “get acquainted” visit. This is a bad marketing plan. Why would a potential client pay the practitioner a lot of money for the first visit and then complete a long form, when the client doesn’t even know if he/she wishes to retain the services of the practitioner? Also, on the first visit, it would be smart to have clients complete [only] a short form which asks for their name, address, phone number and email, and nothing more. If a client agrees to your terms, schedule him/her for another appointment within 24 to 48 hours. It would be advisable to have each client to pay for the visit, which should not exceed 45 to 50 minutes. Some practitioners have also had a great deal of success with a package that includes a certain number of visits.

27. Is the Learning Methodology at KCNH different than other Distance Learning Colleges?

Yes. No other school whether accredited or unaccredited by the government has a system that equals or exceeds that of KCNH. Though we’ve been hearing a lot about major universities permitting students to help design their own course, KCNH is one of the first in the USA to use this method. The old way of reading a textbook again and again, and then answering 500 questions on a test, is an old, out of date method of learning. Furthermore, this flawed system teaches a student nothing.

Our learning method is what sets us apart. Even professors at the University of Florida, a Director of a Nursing School, and a professor at University of California, Berkeley, have said, “KCNH has a learning methodology that is superior to anything that we have ever used or seen. It helps students to not only learn, but also remember what they’ve learned.”

IMPORTANT NOTE CONCERNING FINAL TESTS: Our learning methodology does not use final tests. We believe that “final tests” prove nothing, and we are not alone in holding this view; many Educational Psychologists agree with this statement. We further believe that in the near future "final tests” will be a thing of the past and will be replaced with a methodology based on the same paradigm as that of KCNH. Our method even allows a student to help design much of his/her own degree program. Though more could be said about how unique this is, it is beyond the scope of this paragraph to elucidate on how this actually works. When a student enrolls he/she is sent a Student Study Manual which will explain the details.

28. How may I enroll at Kingdom College of Natural Health?

You need only to fill out this application and once complete click on "Submit." If you prefer, you may fill out the included application and send it through the U.S. postal system. We do not require an application fee.

IF ACCEPTED WHEN DO I SEND MY TRANSCRIPTS? We give you 90 days to send them. KCNH has used this method for more than 20 years and it works very well. Today, there are many immigrants applying for enrollment at KCNH and it usually takes several months for them to obtain their transcripts. So, we allow them 90 days or longer if need be, for KCNH to receive their transcripts, because the transcripts may be in another country.

29. Should I use the title “Counselor” or “Consultant?”

Many states object to anyone using the word “Counselor.” But by virtue of the fact that clients are seeking your services, you should consider yourself as “consulting” with them. Thus the designation of “Consultant” would be more appropriate. At the present, there are no laws in the USA on the books of any state that can restrict or deter you from consulting with anyone [about any matter, that is, if he/she signs an agreement with full disclosure as to what you are and what you will do]. This agreement is essentially asking for your services. Be sure that you clearly state in the contract that you are not a licensed MD, especially if you hold an ND, because if you don’t have a contract and are only verbally communicating with a client, someone may wrongly believe that you said you are an MD when you actually said, “I am an  ND.” And if your client by chance becomes disgruntled about a matter, he/she may contact a lawyer and claim that you said you were an MD. Under no conditions should you use the phrase ‘Medical Practitioner” due to the fact that you cannot legally practice medicine in any state without a state medical license.

30. What kind of organization grants the title of “Diplomate?”

According to those who know academia, it is agreed that the title of “Diplomate” (often wrongly called “diplomat”—that is, an official representing a country abroad—a politician) should never be granted by a college or university. Furthermore, the “Diplomate” status is not a degree, but a designation of honor and distinction that is awarded to outstanding doctors. The “Diplomate” certificate is always granted by an association, society, council or alliance. However, these organizations are usually formed by several eminent doctors, and thus some may be called “colleges.” But these groups are not really “colleges” such as those that offer academic studies or degrees. Rather these kinds of “colleges” grant only the “diplomate” to a doctor who usually has been in private practice for 2 to 5 years. So if he/she is approved by a committee of a “College” he/she will be honored by receiving the title of “diplomate.” Then he/she is deemed to be a “distinguished fellow” in their society, association, or alliance.

THE DIPLOMATE STATUS: Many Medical Doctors are often granted the “Diplomate” [status] after being in practice for a minimum of 2 to 5 years. Also, some chiropractors have been awarded the prestigious title of “Diplomate.” Although the “Diplomate” status is not a degree, it is however a document given to outstanding doctors who are respected and accomplished in their field.

IF YOU ARE DOUBTFUL CONCERNING THIS ANALYSIS, THINK ABOUT THIS: If you post a “Diplomate” certificate on your wall that is issued by the same college or university that granted you a doctorate degree, an academic who really knows academia would immediately know that something reeks (or stinks) of impropriety. The practice of degree-granting colleges and universities awarding someone the “Diplomate” has never been accepted as legitimate in the USA or legitimate in any foreign country. DO YOU WISH TO BE AWARDED A [LEGITIMATE] “DIPLOMATE” AFTER YOU HAVE EARNED A DOCTORATE? See the details on the website of the following:

The American Association of Integrative Medicine at www.aaimedicine.com

NOTE: If you wish, you may search the Internet for other groups that offer a legitimate “diplomate.”

31. When was Kingdom College of Natural Health established?

It was established in 1993, as a not-for-profit 501 3-c corporation.

32. How does KCNH process and grade a student’s coursework?

All coursework, when completed by a student, is shipped to a processing center. The coursework is then reshipped to a qualified professor, who lives in the U.S. mainland, who will grade only courses in which he/she is knowledgeable. Some colleges have office workers, who do to hold any degrees, grading the coursework of students. Thus they should not be grading coursework because they know nothing about the subject being graded. Schools that boast a fast 2 to 3 day turn-a-round period of student grades should be viewed with suspicion, because most distance learning institutions have less than 3 professors or none, so it must be assumed that the owner gets all the money, and grades nearly all the coursework of students. KCNH professors may take up to 30 days because courses must be reshipped to them for grading. Considering that you’re receiving a quality education, is 30 days too long to wait for your grade?  CONSIDER THIS: If a large number of expert professors were located in one city, and inside of a single facility, it would cost a college millions of dollars to provide grading, because the only income professors would receive would be grading papers. Our professors live all throughout the United States and are not domiciled in any one city or facility. Remember, that KCNH has about 50 professors who earn nearly all their income from private practice, not from grading student coursework. KCNH is focused on what is best for our students and the quality of education that each student receives.

33.  How can I motivate myself since distance education requires personal motivation?

Our desire is to motivate students so they will not feel disconnected. Many colleges are weak in the essential area of motivation and don't take time to motivate and talk to students once they're enrolled. Students who've attended other colleges are amazed to learn of the painstaking efforts made by KCNH faculty and staff to stay in touch and reach out to them in order to motivate them. Moreover, students may telephone KCNH at any time during office hours to speak to a Student Support Advisor. SOMETHING YOU SHOULD KNOW: The dropout rate for KCNH is the lowest in the nation. It ranges from 3 to 4 percent while other colleges have approximately a 30 to 35 percent dropout rate or higher. This is why many colleges have various ways of trying to collect as much money upfront as possible. Usually, this is the offering of BIG discounts or special bonuses. If a college is able to offer a BIG discount to a student upfront, how then will it pay its professors, that is, if it has any?

34.  Am I permitted to use the word “nutritionist” in all 50 US states?

No. You should be cautious when using the designation “Nutritionist” because in the past few years nutritionists (mostly Registered Dieticians) have become very aggressive in protecting their rights because a growing number of holistic health consultants are using the term. Check with your state laws before you use the designation of “nutritionist” in your advertisements, website, or on your business cards. However, this doesn’t mean that one cannot consult with or educate individuals about dietary matters while in a private practice.  NOTE: The only state to our knowledge that permits holistic health practitioners to use the term “nutritionist,” is California. This is according to the information we currently have been given. Although many naturopaths have been using the term “nutritionist” in many states, the Registered Dieticians are now cracking down on this trend and finding some unlicensed practitioners thousands of dollars. 

35. What happens if I receive the grade of D?

98 percent of our students are second career individuals and are serious about making good grades, but occasionally a student may not submit all of his/her homework or may perform at a level that is not acceptable to the course-grading professor.

THREE KINDS OF Ds: A professor may give a D+ which is “below average.” Next, a professor may give a D which is “poor.” Or a professor may give a D- which is “Incomplete.” When an incomplete is received, then a student is required to take the course again, or submit only additional coursework on something that he/she may have omitted in certain sections. On some occasions a student may receive an F. If this grade is given to a student, he/she has failed the course, and no compromise is available for the student—he/she must take the course again.

WHAT WE HAVE LEARNED: We are likely the most experienced Distance College of Natural Health in the world, and the following we have learned: “Some applicants may have the money to pay the full amount upfront, so the school has many ways and means of encouraging them to pay up front. But in some instances, we’ve learned that they had attended other colleges and were likely poor students. It is an assumption on our behalf that because they paid up front for their degree studies they were always given the grade of A, merely because they paid up front. So these applicants believe they can pay up front and receive an A for every course when they enroll at KCNH, but then are surprised if their completed coursework is below standard and they receive a C, D, or F on their first course.”

WHY DO SOME DISTANCE EDUCATIONAL NATURAL HEALTH COLLEGES GIVE THE GRADE OF A TO ALL STUDENTS? The answer is: The college (or school) doesn’t want any student to quit, especially if he/she has paid up front and demands a full refund of what was paid. A COMMON SENSE APPROACH: First, to give an A to a student who doesn’t deserve it means that an injustice has been done to a student who struggled to earn an A. Second, it must be considered that when working in the public health field, a graduate needs to know beyond doubt that he/she knows what he/she is doing, because the lives and health of human beings are at stake.

36. What is the average age of students that enroll at KCNH?

The majority are between 38 to 65 years of age.

37. When I graduate, will KCNH assist me in qualifying to purchase quality (professional, third-party tested) supplements for my clients?

Yes, we have spent years in making agreements with some of the top supplement companies in the nation. Though in the past, these companies have sold only to licensed professionals, they now sell to graduates of Kingdom College of Natural Health. Some of the food supplement companies only sell products to those who hold a doctorate from KCNH but there are other companies that will sell products to those who hold a diploma, bachelors or master’s degree.   

38. What is the average educational level of those who enroll at KCNH?

Of those who apply for enrollment at KCNH, the vast majority hold a master or doctorate degree. They come from all walks of life. Some may be truck drivers, office workers, housewives, etc. But the majority of KCNH applicants hold master's and doctorate degrees in education, psychology, business, nursing, medicine, chiropractic, pharmacy, etc…and the list goes on and on. KCNH has always attracted highly educated individuals since its inception, but we do not turn away or reject anyone because he/she may only hold a high school degree or GED.

  

39. Does KCNH have a bookstore for its students?

No, we do not need a bookstore for students. Nearly all of the books (new and used) may be purchased from amazon.com for pennies, or a few dollars. These books are also available for students anywhere in the world, and students may be assured they will receive the best bargain available. If KCNH purchased books from Amazon and then resold them to students, this would cost students almost double or triple what they would pay for textbooks. It seems that form a financial perspective that it is better for students to order their own textbooks from several companies that we shall recommend upon their enrollment and acceptance into a program.

40. How many professors does KCNH currently have?

KCNH works with approximately 50 professors. All of them are or have been in a private practice and some of them are even retired from private practice. Be assured of this fact: KCNH has the best expert professors in the United States. And KCNH is the ONLY Distance Educational College in the USA that can proudly say, “All of our professors have been in a private practice or are currently actively involved in a private practice.”

41. If I earn a doctorate degree from KCNH, should I post my accredited MD degree on my wall alongside my KCNH doctorate, if I don’t have a State Medical Board license to practice as an MD?

Under no conditions should anyone hang an MD degree on his/her wall though it may have been granted by a WHO-accredited school from the Caribbean Islands or West Indies, or granted by a regionally accredited medical school from the US mainland. Though the degree is legitimate, you must obtain a state license to practice medicine with an MD degree, lest you be taken into court for practicing medicine without a license. We are aware of at least three cases where private practice consultants in natural medicine placed an MD degree on his/her wall without the benefit of a state license to practice medicine and are now serving prison sentences that range from 10 to 12 years.

42. Am I permitted to enroll in a dual master/doctorate degree program?

Yes, we permit this, but don’t recommend it. The reason is that when you sign up for a dual degree, you may be required to do fewer studies for the undergraduate or masters degree, but you don’t receive any degree until you complete the assignments for both degrees. Experience has taught us that because the studies at KCNH are challenging and thought-provoking, some students grow tired and weary before they reach the goal line of graduation. So because of this, we never recommend earning two degrees at the same time. Instead, we recommend you earn a degree and then enroll in the second one that you wish to take. In some cases, after consultation with someone from the KCNH “Student Support Division”, one may decide to take a diploma [while earning a doctorate] if he/she wishes to start a small practice to learn what private practice is all about.  It will take someone a few years to complete a doctorate degree from KCNH, and our doctorates are challenging to say the least. But this is good because nobody wishes to learn from a college that has low standards for students, unless he/she wishes to hang up a degree on his/her wall, and yet remain ignorant, because of having not completed the studies required for professional naturopaths.  

43. What designations offered by KCNH may I use to practice my healing arts in the USA and other countries?

The best way for you to get the answer is to visit the Programs and Degrees section of this website and look at the more than 27 certificates and diplomas that we offer. Now, remember this: You may use all of the certificates and diplomas with the exception of these listed below, though the ones listed below may not be prohibited by your state, province, or country. NOTE: We do not recommend that you endeavor to practice any form of healing until you have earned a certificate or diploma, and even then, your knowledge is still limited. Therefore, we suggest that you do not attempt to give any instructions to clients beyond the scope of your learning, especially when you are consulting with clients who have life-threatening illnesses.

Certificates:

Diplomas:

  • Homeopathic Consultant (See notes on “certificates”—the same is applicable for diplomas)
  • Nutritional Consultant  
  • Pediatric Consultant (Most states have strict guidelines for anyone who consults with fathers, mothers, or loved ones about children. Check your state laws)

 

44. When I apply for Admission, how long will it be before I know whether I’ve been accepted?

Complete an online application — give as much detail as possible. Be sure to tell us what program you wish to take but do not send any money, or copies of your transcripts. Upon receipt of your application, we guarantee you a response by email within 24 to 48 hours, with the exception of weekends and major holidays. Thereafter you will be sent an agreement that explains the policies of KCNH, along with offering you several ways in which you may pay your tuition.

45. Do you have area chapters of KCNH in some cities?

Yes, we began establishing chapters in the United States in 2015. You may ask, “What is a Chapter?” A Chapter is not a branch or extension of KCNH established for education but is a way of uniting all students and graduates in cities where KCNH has a large number of students. Usually, meetings are scheduled bi-monthly or quarterly at various restaurants. When an area has a large number of students, we contact someone we feel could be a facilitator and then launch a Chapter. Usually, a meeting incorporates sharing a meal together, discussions, lectures, demonstration of devices that may be used in private practice, and discussing concepts for marketing, etc.

46. Does KCNH offer clinical training?

KCNH only permits experts in various states who are graduates of KCNH to train our graduates. We shall gladly assist you in attaining clinical training once you have completed all of your studies. However, we do permit graduates to take clinical training, regardless of if he/she has completed the required 3 theses. This is, in fact, strongly encouraged as it helps to set you up for long-term success, give you additional focus and open your mind to various possibilities. Many medical schools follow a similar pattern. The clinic that trains you will also give you a “Certificate of Completion for Clinical Training” so you may proudly display it on your wall.  

Note: KCNH is also proud to offer Iridology Training for all students of natural health, regardless of where they are in their educational pursuits, via distance study and live interactive webinar. Learn more here.

47. Does KCNH have a graduation ceremony?

Yes. Currently, it is held in Atlanta, Georgia each year during the month of September at a major hotel in the downtown area. This is a wonderful time for graduates to meet KCNH professors and leaders of KCNH. Current students and even people interested in becoming students are strongly encouraged to attend. Those who attend often say, “It was the greatest experience of my life.”  Be sure to get on our mailing list so that you receive notification of the annual graduation plus all other ongoing KCNH events and news.

48. Do we permit someone to enroll in a single course?

No. We have tried this method in the past, but with poor results. We do, however, offer certificate programs that are not as rigorous as degree programs and therefore take less time to complete. Please look through the Programs and Degrees and speak to a Course Advisor if there are additional questions. A PROVERBIAL QUESTION: Is it customary for any student anywhere in the world to enroll in a college or university, just to take one course? Of course not! But after earning a degree a graduate may take a single course wherein he/she will be given a Certificate of Completion. This is customary at nearly all colleges and universities in the USA and the same applies to KCNH. We are proud to offer postgraduate certifications in addition to certificate programs at the pre-graduation levels.

49. Does KCNH help a graduate get approval for laboratory testing and devices?

Yes, we have several laboratories that we shall recommend that you contact if you wish to offer these services. Also, we will put you in contact with a company that does Hair Tissue Mineral Analysis, and other companies that provide training in Thermographic Scanning Imaging (TSI). These scanning machines are now becoming popular with the public and are in great demand because the [Infra-Red Heat] scan is non-invasive and not painful, and is less costly than the MRI and Mammographic Scan. Moreover, the Thermographic Scanning Imaging (TSI) device is believed by some researchers to detect cancer and heart disease several years earlier than the detection devices used by hospitals and medical doctors. On the other hand, some opposing voices claim that Thermography is not what some claim it is. Also, you may wish to consider HBOT. Some of our doctoral-level practitioners are helping individuals with autism, multiple sclerosis, cancer, recovery from surgery, though the use of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT). HBOT may also be considered as an anti-aging therapy because it supplies more oxygen to human cells. 

50. Is KCNH approved for Financial Aid?

No. Only Institutes, Colleges, and Universities that are recognized by the US Department of Education are allowed to offer financial aid. VETERANS: The same applies to veterans. Though we are patriotic concerning our country and hold veterans in high esteem, we are not able to give them a free education. But when funds are available, we give veterans a better than the average discount. HANDICAPPED (MENTALLY OR PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED) PEOPLE: Some of our most successful practitioners often donate to the KCNH Scholarship fund. This is a fund that offers a full scholarship to the totally disabled. And on some occasions when funds are available, KCNH offers partial scholarships for those who are partially disabled. 

51. Since KCNH is a US-based 501-3 c “not for profit” corporation, may I write off my tuition?

This is questionable. Though some “not for profit” natural health schools claim you may deduct all the tuition you pay their school, this may not be entirely true in every case. For years CPAs have said that the only education that someone may write off on their taxes would be CEUs, (that is, Continuing Educational Units that are required of some professionals so they may keep their license or certification). EXAMPLE: Medical Doctors are required each year to travel (usually by plane) to various cities within the United States for additional updated education in their medical specialty.

WHAT SHOULD YOU EXPECT FROM KCNH? We give receipts to students who request what they have paid KCNH each year. But this point must be made clear: “We do not unequivocally declare that students may write the tuition paid to KCNH off their taxes.” All students should check with their CPA, though some CPAs are not familiar with the not-for-profit 501 c-3 church law, therefore, they may say “yes” without checking the IRS laws for 501 c3s “not for profit” corporations. After you gathered all of the facts, you may decide to write off what you have paid for your education after seriously considering the consequences. We suggest that for all tax-related questions you consult with your accountant. BE AWARE OF THIS: If by chance you experience an IRS audit, you may be required to pay back what you wrote off (deducted from your taxes) that you paid for a school. Most likely there would not be any imprisonment time for you, but you may be required to pay back some or all the money you deducted. NOTE: KCNH has a group of Church Law Legal Specialists who provide KCNH with the most updated IRS laws that pertain to 501 c-3 not-for-profits (tax exempt) groups.  If you need assistance, just contact us.

52. Will I be able to use e-books to complete my studies?

Not all of our textbooks are available via Kindle, or eBooks. However, for those that are, you are more than welcome to use an eBook; use whatever method works for you, since you may be completing some of your studies at your workplace or another place where portability is very important.   

53. If I live outside the USA, how do I make my payments for my studies?

You may make or send a bank transfer, international money order, or use Western Union.

54. If I live outside the USA, will I have to pay extra to have my certificate, diploma, or degree sent to me?

No. Though it is quite costly for KCNH to send these documents to you, we do not charge you for this service.

55. What is the refund policy of KCNH?

For the most part, we follow the standards of the most trusted and honorable schools of education in the USA. The following is the refund policy:

1.) If a student cancels within 30 days after enrollment, the full amount paid shall be refunded.

2.) If a student cancels within 60 days after enrollment, half of the amount paid shall be refunded.

3.) After the 60 day period a student may cancel, dropout, or withdraw, but nothing will be refunded. The reason for this is: If a person is making the lowest payment of $115.00 for his/her degree studies, this means that KCNH is only receiving less than half of what is due for a single 3 to 4 academic credit hour course. In other words, students that choose to pay only $115.00 a month are paying less than half of what is actually due to the school (KCNH) each month. Though a student may drop-out without penalty, remember that KCNH has spent time and invested money in a student. It has paid staff for consulting, professors for grading papers and office workers to keep records. So if KCNH gave all the funds paid back at a date later than 3 to 6 months, this means a student would have received all of his/her education free. Is this logical or fair? Indeed not. 

56. What are the academic standards of KCNH?

The criteria (standards) we have set for our students equals or exceeds the standards and requirements of any regionally accredited universities and colleges in the United States. STANDARDS MADE CLEAR: It is important for you to know that in order to match the standards of regionally accredited colleges and universities a student must invest between 12 to 20 human hours for one academic credit. Hence a 3 credit hour course would require a student to invest approximately 45 to 60 human hours. What amazes our professors is that some of our students invest upwards of 100 to 115 human hours for a 3 academic credit hours course to make an impression so that they may receive an A. This indicates the kind of students who are enrolled at KCNH.

THE STUDENT’S “HOURS INVESTED” TIME SHEET: KCNH requires that each student must keep a daily record of human hours invested and this must be submitted to KCNH along with completed coursework. This schedule record will assist KCNH in evaluating problems such as language barriers, lack of focus, not using time properly, or skipping too many days of study without good reason. This record keeps a student on track and helps to prevent drop-outs. Most Distance Colleges have a 30 to 35 percent drop-out rate, whereas KNCH has one of the lowest drop-out rates in the USA of about 3 to 4 percent. Also, by scheduling a student to complete a course within 8 weeks, we are able to maintain better contact with students, even though a student sometimes may ask for several extensions. We are very sensitive and sympathetic concerning the death of loved ones, loss of job, divorce, general conflict, etc., because such matters usually affect a student in various ways. KCNH tries to lend a helping hand in keeping with a student on track so that he/she will not lag behind and become discouraged.

57. Why doesn’t KCNH use the “Go-At-Your-Own-Pace” learning principle?

KCNH has accepted students into its ranks who were victims of schools that closed up in the past 8 years that used the “Go-at-your-own-pace” method. The first to be mentioned is Clayton College of Natural Health (Alabama) and the second is Global College of Natural Health (California). In regards to Global College of Natural Health, KCNH was selected by the State of California and the President of Global College of Natural Health as the college of choice to teach-out more than 700 students who had not completed their studies. QUESTION: Why doesn’t the “Go-at-your-own pace” learning system work? Please consider the following example and you’ll understand our reasoning.

EXAMPLE: If you were instructed to drive on a major U.S. Interstate Highway and were told that “You may go-at-your-pace,” do you think this privilege and free choice would end up in disaster? Yes. Beyond doubt, having the freedom to “go at your own pace” is a protocol that leads to high drop-out rates. As a rule, the speed limits on most Interstates are 70 to 75 miles per hour, though 80 percent of drivers drive about 80 to 85 miles per hour. Of course, the State Police in every state understand this and are vigilant in checking speed limits. But if each driver was told, “You may drive at your own pace, whether it is 45 miles an hour or 145 miles per hour, would this create a problem?” Yes, it would. Here’s the reason why it’s a bad idea. If people drove 45 miles an hour it would cause 18 wheeler trucks to ram them in the rear, and likely seriously injure or even kill them. On the other hand, if people drove 145 miles an hour, this speed would be too dangerous, because if a driver needed to suddenly stop, many other drivers including himself/herself would be injured or killed. Therefore, a standard is set for everyone to drive between 70 to 75 miles an hour, thus diminishing the chance of accidents. This illustration proves that when the speed limit is left up to the driver, there will be countless problems. This is pure deductive reasoning and logic insofar as we are concerned, yet other schools are baffled when KCNH makes the statement that it only has a 3 to 4 percent student drop-out rate. While nearly 90 percent of other natural health distance learning colleges are saying, “Complete your studies at your pace.” Surely studying “At your own pace” is a bad idea. But we at KCNH continue to maintain that a student should “Complete his/her studies at a guided-pace.” Moreover, this final point must be made: The KCNH student withdrawal or drop-out rate may even be lower than 3 to 4 percent because approximately 80 percent of students who drop-out or withdraw [in writing] reenroll to complete their studies within one to two years. Regrettably, we have no documented data on how many students reenroll, but it is estimated at 80 percent. We have learned that most often a drop-out is prompted by divorce, loss of job, having to be caretakers for elderly parents, or is the result of the death of close loved ones.  

58. Does KCNH offer a diploma or degree in Spanish?

Yes, we have a diploma in Spanish, and currently, are developing more programs in Spanish.

59. Does KCNH have a diploma or degree in Integrative Medicine?

No. The reason is that all of our studies may be used by a practitioner who wishes to integrate naturopathic modalities into allopathic modalities. The term “Integrative Medicine” is most commonly thought of as: A.) “A method of integrating natural remedies (that is, naturopathy, homeopathy, herbalism, and other remedies) into a practice of allopathic (pharmaceutical drug) medicine which is used by Medical Doctors, Family Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.” Thus, there is no possible way to design a diploma or degree for anyone who wishes to practice “Integrative Medicine.” The term “Integrative Medicine” has developed overtime in the past 15 years to mean what was said in the aforementioned listed as “A.” Chiropractics as a general rule do not use the term, but instead use “Functional Medicine” which is an idea that borrows the essentials of naturopathy and integrates it with chiropractic medicine. Thus “Functional Medicine” is not new, but is a new term that alludes to something that is old.

60. Could I learn something about the history of natural healing (or naturopathy) in the USA?

Unknown to the public is that chiropractics welcomed Benedict Lust (a Catholic Monk) in 1890, believed to be the founder of American Naturopathy, when he arrived in New York as a friend of chiropractic medicine and natural healing. Thereafter for nearly 60 years, naturopaths and chiropractics worked side-by-side sharing ideas, combining both naturopathy and chiropractic modalities in ways that produced results for illnesses. During these years, neither chiropractics nor naturopaths held a license, but chiropractics began to attain licensure in the early 1960’s. On the other hand, the naturopaths gained licensure in several states in the late 1930’s, but through a political ploy, MDs and the Pharmaceutical companies were able to convince the US states (about 10 states) that had granted licensure to naturopaths to revoke them. NOTE: Traditional naturopathy used hydrotherapy (water), herbs, limited surgery, natural child birth, and other forms of manipulation of the muscles and bones similar to chiropractic and osteopathy. 

61. Does KCNH offer any accelerated degree programs?

Yes, but only some doctorate degrees are approved for acceleration and certain conditions do apply. When someone holds a recognized doctorate and/or sometimes the equivalent, a telephone interview may be arranged to learn about qualifying to enroll in one of the doctorate programs offered by KCNH. A Professional Evaluator from KCNH will ask questions by telephone interview regarding what  degree and/or degrees an applicant may hold, practice experience, and also inquire as to what educational  or medical institution (s) granted his/her degrees.

THE FOLLOWING DEGREES ARE ACCELERATED DEGREES (or Post-Doctoral Degrees):

  1. The Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (NMD) 40 Academic Credits- Time of completion: 13-15 months
  2. The Doctor of Homeopathy (HMD) 40 Academic Credits-Time of completion: 13-15 months
  3. Degrees by Testing – the AHPLEX (This is called the Alternative Health Professional Level Examination. This examination has been hailed by many academics and professional practitioners in the USA, as one of the greatest, yet most difficult examinations they’ve ever taken. This lengthy examination is serves to accelerate someone who may have been educated in allopathic or naturopathic medicine, but has never earned a doctorate degree in some form of natural or alternative medicine. 

62. What type of support does KCNH offer once a student enrolls?

We have an Online Campus that students are encouraged to join. It is a great tool through which students may connect with other students, professors, and their student advisor. Our Online Campus has an enormous number of resources as well as videos, CDs, lectures, etc., and a bunch of folks who’d like to meet other students and graduates so as to discuss the healing arts.         

63. Does a degree earned at KCNH have any value?

Absolutely! Graduates of Kingdom College of Natural Health do not practice medicine; they are considered to be consultants/specialists/educators in the natural alternative health field. As of today’s date, some analysts believe there are nearly 500,000 non-licensed natural health consultants practitioners who hold unaccredited degrees in the US. In fact, there is not a single state in the USA that prohibits natural health consultants from practicing their healing arts, so long as a consultant gives full disclosure via a contract to each client who receives his/her services.

Only 18 states have a licensing board for naturopathic medicine, but none restrict a practitioner from consulting with clients, though a “natural health consultant” cannot diagnose, prescribe, or treat diseases, or administer drugs or surgery. One third of the KCNH student body is composed of RNs, MDs, and others in the medical field. Be reminded, that though they may hold a license in their field, they do not hold a license to practice natural medicine, yet are permitted to consult with others about the use of natural remedies, unabated. KCNH has some graduates who have gained such notoriety and prestige in their communities that they have been invited to teach and speak at conferences of medical doctors and chiropractors for the reason of educating them in the field of natural health. One of our graduates in Michigan, who doesn’t hold a license, was recently voted to be “Naturopath of the Year” because of his outstanding contributions to the health of individuals. He also has now been asked to provide clinical training for healthcare graduates of a regionally accredited university in Michigan.

This field is fast emerging, but was forced to go underground about 115 years ago in the USA because of the rise of allopathy, miracle drugs, and politics.  But be assured, it is now the fastest growing field in the USA and around the world. People are now learning much about the truth concerning natural medicine through social media, the internet, etc. They are learning that natural health modalities provide many benefits to anyone suffering with cancer, heart disease, chronic pain, and a host of other maladies.  Again, most consultants/educators/specialists are not required to hold a license, but a small number of individuals are difficult to convince, especially, if they are not in our ranks and are not in the know about what is happening in this emerging field. This group continues to believe that if the US government is not backing an education program, it is worthless. And thus these advocates of governmental accreditation are difficult to convince regarding the value and merit of the kind of degrees offered by KCNH. Yes, it is true that the credits earned for a degree at KCNH will not transfer to a regionally accredited university, but sadly, there is not a single U.S. university that has a natural health degree program, with the exception of the five universities that graduate those who will hold the designation of “Licensed Naturopathic Physician.” Some KCNH graduates (that is, if they are nationally certified, and not licensed), may reside in states that do not license NDs, and thus are able to file insurance claims and qualify to be health care providers. They may also provide thermographic services, lab tests, and many other services. 

One may acquire a license as a “Licensed Naturopathic Physician,” which is valid in 18 states if graduated from one of the five regionally accredited universities (or colleges) that grants the designation of ND or NMD. But this title is worthless in many cases to the recipient’s, because after earning their degrees, many return to their home states and open a practice, but aren’t able to get a license because their home state has no licensing board. The saddest thing is: Licensed Naturopathic Physicians usually invest between $220,000 to 260,000, and are in debt to the U.S. government for many years in paying off their student loans, and less than 50 percent of them do not enter private practice within the first five years after graduating—a sad story, indeed.” KCNH doctorate graduates earn their degree in approximately 3 to 4 years, and about 64 percent open a private practice the first year upon graduating and many earn a higher income than those who are Licensed Naturopathic Physicians. Best of all, our graduates, spend between $5,000 to $6,000 for their doctorates degrees and are debt free when they graduate.

Note that at the time of the creation of this document all information was deemed as true and correct. It is up to you to do your due diligence to validate all claims, advice, and information. If you have additional questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

Rev. 02/15/16 // Copyright 2016 © Kingdom College of Natural Health, Inc.